Scheduling and Timing

Nanospark is designed to work as a digital timer allowing the consumer to create a programmable schedule for their industrial operations. This easy to install package controls when devices turn on or off at the preset time creating overall equipment efficiency.

Digital Timer Switch Comparison Chart

Digital Timer Switch Comparison Chart

As we prepared to focus on promoting Nanospark as a digital timer for equipment, we accumulated a fair amount of data about other digital timers on the market.  We’ve compressed the data down to key features, and represented it in a comparison chart. We hope this will help you see the value of Nanospark for your timing needs.   There are a couple things from the above chart worth expanding on.  First is the interface.  Most of the digital timers have a seven segment display (that is a small LCD screen) and then 6 to 9 buttons to cycle through menus and setup programs.   Nanospark is a true touch screen- using an app on a tablet, smartphone or iPod touch as the interface.  This makes programming schedules simple to learn and easy to setup. Next, take note of the remote override feature.  Though given the same label, Nanospark’s remote override is quite different from Tork’s.  Tork includes a remote override switch that can be installed anywhere within a facility and then wired back to the timer with a control wire (small gauge, low-voltage).  So the “remote” switch is still somewhere within wiring distance. Contrast that with Nanospark’s remote override which is through text message.  Nanospark uses a service called Twilio which, for $20 or less a year, allows you to  check on the status of all equipment wired to the timer (individually or systemically).  Then with a text message turn equipment on or off thereby overriding the current schedule. Of course, we can’t neglect the bottom line.  Nanospark excels when we look at number of circuits (or outputs) for the price.  Timers in the same price range as Nanospark only have one or two circuits; Nanospark has 10.  Without Nanospark, to get that many channels- that many pieces of equipment controlled by one timer- you’re looking at 3 to 10 times the cost of Nanospark. We’d love to hear from you too.  What features do you find important for your equipment timers?  What features are missing that you would love to have (we many just build it for you)? If you prefer to make your own in-depth comparison, you may appreciate the following links to the product pages on the various timers: Nanospark Universal Equipment Timer Intermatic ET8215B Tork ELC series Omron H5F Tork E Series Intermatic...

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Industrial Timer for an Antiquated Machine | Nanospark

Industrial Timer for an Antiquated Machine | Nanospark

Industrial Timer for an Antiquated Machine We use Nanospark around our facility, as an industrial timer to do many things, such as to save electricity and wear-and-tear on one of our machines. In the tool and die part of our shop we have an old swiss machine (or screw machine).  The swiss machine is programmed with gears rather than electronics.  Whether there is bar stock in the machine or not, it’ll continue to spin and cycle through the tools. A typical bar will last anywhere from 7 to 9 hours in the swiss machine.  So at the very beginning of the shift a bar is loaded and the machine cuts all day. Then, just before leaving, we load another bar and walk away- knowing that by about 1am it’ll be spinning and flipping between tools- just cutting the air. Prior to Nanospark this would mean each night wasting about 6 hours of electricity and needless thousands of rotations for the machine and it’s tools.  Through a 5V relay, we wired Nanospark’s digitalOutput1 to the power supply creating a digital timer.  The screw machine is turned on from the digital tab of the app. Then we setup an event in the Scheduling tab to shut off the machine at 2:01 am.  In the morning when we walk in it’s quietly at rest, waiting for a new bar. This has been going so well that we’re expanding the operation.  Recently we ordered the wires and relay’s to add three temperature baths, a compressor, and a water valve to this one Nanospark’s scheduling profile. Learn more about this digital timer. ** Update on this project ** Last week one of the technicians in our shop asked if we could also regulate the air line that comes to this screw machine.  We had some 120V solenoids on hand; so, sure!  He took care of the piping, adding some adapters to the solenoid, while I grabbed a couple wires- and we were off. As you can see in the picture, the relay board that we used has 4 relays on it.  So I wired a wall plug into the second relay’s power slot and the power leg of the solenoid into the NO slot.  The grounds were tied together to complete the circuit.  Next I connected Nanospark’s digitalOutput4 to IN2 on the relay.  Now the On/Off slider on the digital screen of the app...

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Digital Timer Switch | Universal Equipment Timer

Digital Timer Switch | Universal Equipment Timer

How can you use the scheduling feature of the Nanospark Controller app to manage the equipment in your facility?

Through the scheduling tab of the Nanospark Controller app (free on iTunes), you’re able to control when outputs turn on and off. In the demo below we’ve scheduled events for a coffee maker, a hot plate, a motor to crack the egg and an actuator for the toaster. Perhaps it’s a bit whimsical to have breakfast prepared for you while on your way to work- but imagine the real possibilities as an equipment timer.

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The Intuitive Digital Timer | Nanospark

The Intuitive Digital Timer | Nanospark

There certainly are digital timers out there, so why use Nanospark in this way? Because it’s Versatile, Centralized, and Intuitive. Nanospark can act as a digital timer for up to ten different pieces of equipment; even if they run off varied voltages. And the interface to set and manage the scheduled events is simple and clear.

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